DIVVS·IVLIVS

Commentarii de religione Divi Iulii vel primordio Christianitatis

Tag: Easter

Liberalia and Easter: The breads of the Holy Week

There is a long tradition of bakery products for Easter all over continental Europe—and even beyond, as the popularity of the hot cross bun in the UK and former British colonies like the US and Australia shows. In the more traditional regions, especially those in the Mediterranean area, it is often a form of plain flatbread or wafers that are a prominent part of the tradition. In Spain a whole wafer industry has developed for the Semana Santa, and in rural areas with stronger and older traditions these wafers and especially more traditional flatbreads are sold or handed out to the people attending the ceremonies of the Holy Week, especially on Good Friday and on Easter Sunday. (Please note that these products are all distinct from the liturgical communion wafers.) In Greece there is for example a long tradition of women baking the so-called koulouria using outdoor ovens (see image below).

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Jesus and Caesar: Brief notes on Palm Sunday

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We’ve read lots of interpretations of Jesus’ triumphant entry into the City. We’ve read for instance that it was modeled on Roman imperial triumphs. At first glance this would seem like a false notion because Jesus clearly does not enter the city on a chariot, although all other properties do fit the picture, for example the palm branches, the spread garments, the decorated mount, the procession, the triumphant cry, the praising of both the triumphator and the highest god, as well as the entry into the city and into the temple. But it’s a fact that in two of the gospels Jesus enters the city on a young and unbacked horse, a foal, a πωλοc, “whereon never man sat”. That’s right, not on a donkey. Mark and Luke are quite clear about that. Matthew had added his usual midrash and needed to align his Gospel with the LXX, and—so it would seem—he was forced to introduce a second equid for the Old Testament prophecy to make any sense, a donkey, but couldn’t lose the original foal, which results in Jesus riding into the City on two equids at the same time, a foal and a donkey: πωλοc and ονοc. (John revised it further, merged both properties and only speaks of a young donkey, an “ass colt”.) But is that really what the evangelists did? And where’s the connection to Julius Caesar, if the Gospel is really a diegetic transposition of the historical sources on Caesar’s Civil War?

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Écija | Conferencia: 17 de Marzo | Lecture: 17 March

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Francesco Carotta ha dado en la ciudad de Écija, la antigua colonia cesárea de Astigi, una conferencia sobre la importancia del 17 de marzo: 17 de Marzo – Liberalia: Victoria de Munda, Fundación de la Colonia Astigi, Funeral de Julio César. Su conferencia también incluye la investigación previa sobre la fecha del funeral de César y su conexión con la última victoria en la guerra civil. Los textos en español están disponibles en PDF aquí (revisado y bifurcado [junio/julio 2010]): Astigi quod Iulienses – El misterio de Astigi y la palmera de Munda”; “Noche de San Juan”).

Francesco Carotta has held a lecture in the city of Écija, the former Caesarian colony of Astigi, on the importance of 17 March: 17 de Marzo – Liberalia: Victoria de Munda, Fundación de la Colonia Astigi, Funeral de Julio César. His lecture also includes previous research on the date of Caesar’s funeral and its connection to the final victory during the Civil War. The Spanish texts are available as PDFs here (revised and forked [June/July 2010]): Astigi quod Iulienses – El misterio de Astigi y la palmera de Munda”; “Noche de San Juan”).

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