DIVVS·IVLIVS

Commentarii de religione Divi Iulii vel primordio Christianitatis

Category: Tradition

We come to bury Caesar! — Begraben wollen wir Caesar!

We come to bury Caesar!

Printing a journal takes its time: almost a year of waiting after peer review… but now the article on the accurate historical date of Julius Caesar’s funeral has been published in the Revue des Études Anciennes… and the conclusions are shaking many foundations… a new image emerges… and after more than 2000 years we have finally buried Caesar. See below for the links to Liberalia tu accusas!.

Begraben wollen wir Caesar!

Eine Zeitschrift zu drucken dauert seine Zeit: fast ein Jahr des Wartens nach dem Peer-Review… aber nun ist der Artikel über das korrekte historische Datum von Julius Caesars Beisetzung in der Revue des Études Anciennes veröffentlicht worden… und die Ergebnisse rütteln an so einigen Fundamenten… ein neues Bild erscheint… und nach mehr als 2000 Jahren haben wir Caesar endlich bestattet. Hier sind die Links zu Liberalia tu accusas!.

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Revista de Arqueología republishes “Orpheos Bakkikos”

CaesarSimulacrum_OrpheosBakkikos.jpg
Caesar’s funeral: wax effigy on tropaeum (left) | “Orpheos Bakkikos” artifact (right)

The Spanish journal for ancient archaeology Revista de Arqueología has reprinted an abridged version of the article “Orfeo Báquico – La Cruz Desaparecida”, originally published in 2009 in the theological journal Isidorianum 18 (35): 179–217. Here’s the abstract taken from the English version “Orpheos Bakkikos — The Missing Cross”:

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The death of Christ on Holy Wednesday

Bercianos de Aliste is a small and remote Spanish village near the Portugese border. Due to its century-long isolation the town’s parish has retained a very ancient and unadorned tradition of the Semana Santa, the Spanish Holy Week leading up to Easter. At first sight they seem to be following the standard rituals of the Holy Week: During the night before Holy Thursday a monumento is built for the host. From Wednesday to Good Friday women mourn for the enshrined body and watch over their Lord and Savior. Then the host is shared during the Holy Thursday liturgy. The Good Friday rituals begin in the morning, when the priest symbolizes the deceased Christ by lying on the floor.

BercianosDeAliste_SemanaSanta_1.jpg

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